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By 7 DAYS PEDIATRICS
February 08, 2021
Category: Children's Health

Choosing a pediatrician is vital to the health of your child. It's important to have a pediatrician you trust to provide your child with proper care and provide support to parents. The doctors at 7 Days Pediatrics are here for you in Edison, NJ, and South Plainfield, NJ, when you need a pediatrician.

How to choose a pediatrician

If you're looking for a new pediatrician in your area, ask neighbors and friends about their experiences. If you're looking for a pediatrician for a new baby, your OBGYN may have recommendations. Consider the location of the practice to your home or daycare. 7 Days Pediatrics is conveniently located in Edison, NJ.

When looking at potential pediatricians, here's a few things to keep in mind:

  • Credentials and experience - what is the doctor's background and training?
  • References - was the doctor recommended by friends or family?
  • Insurance - does the practice accept your insurance?

Once you've done some research, a first appointment is the best way to see if the pediatrician is a good fit. For a new baby, some pediatricians will visit the newborn in the hospital if they are affiliated with the same hospital.

Your first visit with a pediatrician

An initial office visit helps determine if the pediatrician will be a good fit for you and your child. During a first appointment, take time to ask the doctor questions. Take note of the office hours and how the practice handles emergency visits. Ask what hospital your child would be hospitalized at in an emergency. For some parents, the doctor must have parenting experience or similar parenting philosophies. The best pediatrician for you will consider how you care for your child with their care plan.

It's best for your child's health that they have a positive relationship with their doctor and visit regularly. At a first appointment, make sure your child is comfortable with the doctor, or see how the doctor interacts with your newborn.

Don't wait to choose a pediatrician and have a first visit! Come see the doctors at 7 Days Pediatrics in Edison, NJ, or South Plainfield, NJ. Give us a call at (732) 548-3210.

By 7 DAYS PEDIATRICS
February 03, 2021
Category: Children's Health
Tags: Diabetes  
Diabetes in ChildrenIn the past, the most common type of diabetes to affect children and teens was type 1 diabetes. This is also referred to as juvenile diabetes. In children with type 1 diabetes, their bodies do not produce insulin, a hormone responsible for helping deliver glucose into the cells. While type 1 diabetes is quite common in children, pediatricians are also seeing a rise in type 2 diabetes in children and teens. This coincides with an increase in childhood obesity rates.
 
Symptoms of Type 1 Diabetes
 
While type 1 diabetes can appear in children of any age, it’s most commonly diagnosed in children between the ages of 5 and 6, and 11 to 13. It’s important to recognize the symptoms of type 1 diabetes early, as high blood sugar levels can lead to serious complications. Symptoms of type 1 diabetes typically appear suddenly, and the most common symptoms include,
  • Frequent urination, particularly at night
  • Excessive thirst or hunger
  • Weight loss, despite increased appetite
  • Cuts, bruises, and wounds that don’t heal or are slow to heal
Symptoms of Type 2 Diabetes

Unlike type 1 diabetes, type 2 diabetes symptoms usually appear gradually. While type 2 diabetes has always been considered “adult-onset” diabetes, this has changed over the years, thanks to the obesity epidemic in children. If your child is obese or overweight, they may be at an increased risk for developing type 2 diabetes. Symptoms of type 2 diabetes are similar to type 1 diabetes, the only marked differences in symptoms are,
  • Blurry vision
  • Severe fatigue
  • Tingling or numbness in the hands and feet
Treating Diabetes in Children

Even though there is no cure for diabetes, there are ways that your child’s pediatrician can help manage their symptoms. The goal of treatment is to control blood sugar levels to prevent complications and lessen symptoms.
 
The standard treatment includes managing diabetes through insulin therapy, which involves either daily insulin injections or an insulin pump. You will also need to monitor your child’s blood sugar levels throughout the day. Along with insulin therapy, you will also want to make sure that your child is eating a healthy diet and is getting regular exercise (at least one hour a day).
 
If your child is overweight or showing signs of diabetes, you must talk with your child’s pediatrician right away. A simple blood test can check their blood sugar levels and determine whether or not they have diabetes. Since uncontrolled diabetes can lead to serious health problems, it’s a good idea to see a pediatrician as soon as possible.
By 7 DAYS PEDIATRICS
January 22, 2021
Tags: Tonsillitis  

Has your child been complaining of throat pain? Tonsillitis, one of the illnesses and conditions treated by the pediatricians at 7 Days Pediatrics, may be to blame. The doctors serve the South Plainfield, Perth Amboy, Woodbridge, and Edison, NJ, areas from three convenient offices.

What is tonsillitis?

The tonsils are two soft lumps of tissue located on either side of the back of the throat. The tissues trap germs, helping your child stay healthy. Unfortunately, tonsils can become infected by the same germs they trap. Both viruses and bacteria can cause tonsillitis. A viral infection is most likely to be the cause of tonsillitis in younger children, according to Medline Plus. Bacterial infections are often responsible for infections in children ages 5 to 15 years.

What are the symptoms of tonsillitis?

If your child has tonsillitis, he or she may experience some of these symptoms:

  • Inflamed Tonsils: Tonsils can be seen when your child opens his or her mouth, although you may need a small flashlight to view them clearly. If your son or daughter has tonsillitis, the tonsils may be red or swollen. You may also see yellow or white spots on them.
  • Pain: Throat pain may be the first sign that there is something wrong with your child's tonsils. Your child may also mention other types of pain, such as a stiff neck, headache, or stomach ache.
  • Fever: A fever may accompany any viral or bacterial infection, including tonsillitis.
  • Difficulty Swallowing: Inflamed, enlarged tonsils can make it harder to swallow easily.
  • Swollen Lymph Nodes: Lymph node swelling is common if your child has an infection. If you feel the nodes on either side of the neck, you may notice that they seem larger than normal.

How do pediatricians treat tonsillitis?

Bacterial infections are treated with antibiotics. Although antibiotics aren't helpful if your child's tonsillitis is caused by a viral infection, there are a few things you can do to keep your child comfortable while he or she recovers.

If you don't have ice cream, ice pops, or gelatin on hand, stop by a South Plainfield, Perth Amboy, Woodbridge, or Edison grocery store and pick up these items. Cool foods and drinks soothe inflamed tissues in your child's throat and can decrease pain. Over-the-counter medication, like acetaminophen or ibuprofen, can reduce pain and fevers. Gargling with salt water and sucking on cough drops may also be helpful.

Although tonsillectomies used to be performed on a routine basis years ago, the surgery is usually only recommended if your child has frequent bouts of tonsillitis.

Are you worried that your child may have tonsillitis? Call the South Plainfield, Perth Amboy, Woodbridge, and Edison, NJ, area pediatricians at (732) 548-3210 to schedule your son or daughter's appointment.

By 7 DAYS PEDIATRICS
January 19, 2021
Category: Child Safety
Tags: Tetanus Shot  
Tetanus ShotAll children need to get a tetanus shot. When we think of tetanus we often think of rusty nails; however, this bacterium isn’t just found on rusty metal items, it also lives in soil and dirt. If bacteria come in contact with a wound or opening in the skin this can lead to a serious infection. If your child, like many, enjoys running around outside barefoot, they must be keeping up with their tetanus shots.
 
When should my child get their first tetanus shot?

While tetanus can cause some serious symptoms including “lockjaw," it is completely preventable with a vaccination. The DTaP vaccine is used to prevent tetanus (along with diphtheria and pertussis) and your child will get their first series of shots at 2, 4, and 6 months. Your child will also need another tetanus shot between the ages of 15 to 18 months old and between 4-6 years old.
 
Children should continue to get a tetanus shot during their annual pediatric checkup until they turn 18 years old. Instead of getting the DTap vaccine, which they got as a young child, they will get the Tdap booster shot that still protects against diphtheria, tetanus, and pertussis.
 
Once your child reaches adulthood, they will get a Td vaccination, which will protect them against tetanus and diphtheria.
 
What are the signs and symptoms of tetanus?

Most children will develop symptoms within two weeks of exposure to the bacteria. Symptoms of tetanus include,
  • Painful and severe muscle spasms
  • Shoulder, jaw, and neck stiffness
  • Difficulty breathing and swallowing
  • Rapid heart rate
  • Fever
If left untreated, tetanus can be life-threatening so it’s important to bring your child in right away if they develop any of these symptoms.
 
If it’s time for your child’s next tetanus shot, your pediatrician will be able to administer the vaccine either during their next routine checkup or at a separate important. You must be keeping up with your child’s vaccine schedule so that they are fully protected against potentially dangerous communicable diseases.
By 7 DAYS PEDIATRICS
January 19, 2021
Category: Child Safety
Keeping Your Child Safe While TravelingWhether you’re simply taking a weekend trip to visit the grandparents, or you and the family are flying internationally, you must know how to keep everyone healthy and safe while on vacation. After all, the last thing you want to worry about is looking up local hospitals near your hotel in the middle of the night. Here are some tips for how to keep your little ones safe while traveling.
 
Bring all Medications with You…
And make sure you have enough. This is especially important if you are going to spend a couple of weeks on vacation. You will want to make sure that your child has access to their medications and that they don’t run out. If you’re flying, make sure to pack all medications in your carry-on, just in case the airline happens to lose your luggage.
 
Get the Appropriate Vaccinations
While travel throughout the US won’t typically require your child to get inoculated, traveling abroad may require certain vaccines ahead of time. You must schedule an appointment with your child’s pediatrician about a month in advance to make sure that they get all appropriate vaccinations before travel.
 
Depending on where you’re traveling, your pediatrician may recommend certain immunizations against typhoid, yellow fever, meningitis, or rabies. Your child may also require antimalarial drugs to protect against malaria.
 
Get Travel Insurance
While we never want to imagine a medical emergency happening while abroad, it is important to be prepared just in case your child breaks their arm or gets sick. In this case, having travel insurance can be a major stress-reliever and lifesaver. Most travel insurance covers kids under 17 years of age and also provides emergency care and 24/7 assistance.
 
Traveling During COVID-19
Of course, during the pandemic, medical officials highly recommend avoiding any travel unless essential. While we understand everyone’s desire to travel again and for life to return to normal, we must be doing our part to keep everyone safe during this time. If you do need to travel make sure to wear a mask, practice good hygiene and social distancing, and choose outdoor places such as parks where you can avoid crowds and other people.
 
If you do have questions about traveling with your child, or about getting them the proper vaccines before travel, talk with your child’s pediatrician. It’s important to talk with a pediatrician a month or more before your trip so that you can ensure that your child has everything they need before traveling.




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