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Posts for category: Safety

By 7 DAYS PEDIATRICS
September 02, 2022
Category: Safety
Tags: Asthma  

Need help controlling your child’s asthma symptoms? Your pediatrician can help.

We know that seeing your child cough, wheeze and have trouble taking a full breath can be more than a little scary, but it’s essential to know that your pediatrician can provide your child with a custom asthma treatment plan that helps get their symptoms under control. Your pediatrician can provide your child with the care and treatment they need to lead rich, healthy lives without being at the mercy of their asthma symptoms.

So, how will your child's doctor treat their asthma?

First, We’ll Create an Action Plan

Your pediatrician can provide you and your child with the adequate asthma control needed to avoid missed school days, sleepless nights and trips to the hospital. Your pediatrician can create a customized action plan just for your child. This action plan is designed to help you and your child get better control over their symptoms.

This plan will have specific instructions on ways to manage your child’s asthma and what to do when symptoms flare up, so you are never confused about what to do when your child starts to notice symptoms or if their symptoms worsen.

Next, We’ll Prescribe Medication

In most cases, your children’s doctors will prescribe two medications to manage childhood asthma. The medications and doses prescribed by your pediatrician will depend on the severity and frequency of your child’s symptoms. The two most commonly used asthma medications include,

  • Controlled medication: This is something your child will take every day, even if they feel fine. This medication helps prevent inflammation in the airways and reduces the risk of an attack.
  • Fast-acting medication: Even though controlled medication can significantly reduce airway inflammation and the likelihood of attacks, sometimes triggers such as exercise or stress can still exacerbate your child’s asthma symptoms. When you notice the very beginnings of a flare-up, your child must take this fast-acting medication to alleviate symptoms quickly.

We May Recommend a Flu Shot

If your child has ever had to deal with the flu before, you know from firsthand experience that asthma and the flu do not mix! The flu virus can exacerbate asthma symptoms and lead to more severe complications such as pneumonia. This is why your pediatrician may encourage you to get your child vaccinated against the flu every year.

By 7 DAYS PEDIATRICS
September 01, 2021
Category: Safety
Hand, Foot and Mouth DiseaseHand, foot and mouth disease isn’t a childhood infection that’s often discussed but should be. After all, this communicable viral infection is more common in young children than most people realize. If you are concerned about hand, foot and mouth disease, or would simply like to know more, your pediatrician can certainly provide you with the information you need. In the meantime, here are some FAQS that can help you get the facts on this contagious infection.

Is hand, foot and mouth disease dangerous?

While the name might make this condition sound rather frightening, the truth is that many kids under the age of five develop this illness. This is because these viruses are quite contagious. Even though this most often impacts young children, this infection can also present in older children, teens, and even adults.

What are the symptoms?

The incubation period for hand, foot and mouth disease is about 3-6 days from exposure. At first, symptoms may appear mild and look similar to the common cold (e.g. runny nose, fever, and sore throat); however, blisters will then start to develop within the mouth and on the body (often the palms of the hands and soles of the feet).

How is it diagnosed?

A diagnosis is often made by a pediatrician through a simple physical evaluation. They will go through your child’s medical history, examine the blisters and ask questions about your child’s symptoms to determine whether this could be hand, foot and mouth disease. Some testing may be performed to rule out other conditions.

How is hand, foot and mouth disease treated?

Unfortunately, there isn’t a medication that will get rid of hand, foot and mouth disease. Like most viral infections, the infection just has to run its course; however, there are certain things your pediatrician may prescribe or recommend that you do to ease your child’s symptoms. For example, ibuprofen may be recommended to help ease the pain as well as your child’s fever. Of course, it’s always a good idea to speak with your pediatrician before you start your child on any medication, even over-the-counter medications.

If your child develops symptoms of hand, foot and mouth disease it’s important that you see your pediatrician as soon as possible for an evaluation, as they will want to make sure that this is truly what’s causing their symptoms.
By 7 DAYS PEDIATRICS
February 15, 2021
Category: Safety
Tags: Pediatrician   Stitches  
When Does My Child Need StitchesWe all know how accident-prone kids can be. They get bruises, bumps, cuts, and scrapes from time and time. Most of the time, these boo-boos are nothing to worry about, but sometimes a cut or laceration may require turning to your pediatrician for stitches. Does your child need stitches? We know it isn’t always easy to tell. Here are some telltale signs that your child might need stitches,
  • Apply pressure to the cut for five minutes. If it’s still bleeding after five minutes, it probably needs stitches
  • The cut is more than ½-inch deep or longer
  • The cut is around their eye
  • The cut is on their face or neck and is longer than ¼ inch
  • The cut is gaping open
  • There is an object sticking out of it, including debris or glass
  • The cut is spurting blood
Any cut that spurts blood could be a sign of a nicked artery. Immediately apply pressure to the area and head to your local ER for immediate medical attention.

When should I call the pediatrician?

If in doubt about whether or not your child may need stitches, call your pediatrician. With the introduction of telehealth visits, many pediatricians can now look at images of the injury or wound through a simple online appointment and determine whether the child or teen needs to come in for stitches. While the warning signs above are telltale indicators that your child may need stitches, even if the cut doesn’t need stitches, you should still see the doctor if:
  • The cut was made by a rusty or metal object
  • There is redness, swelling, pus, or other signs of infection
  • The child has been bitten by an animal
  • The cut hasn’t healed within 10 days
  • There is still severe pain after a few hours
Cuts and wounds made by metal, rusty, or dirty objects may require your child to get a tetanus shot. This is why you should see your pediatrician right away, as it’s important for them to get this shot within 2-3 days after the injury.

If you still aren’t sure whether or not your child should get stitches, it doesn’t hurt to give your pediatrician a call. Let us know the symptoms your child is experiencing, and we can determine if their injury requires a closer look from our team. Call us today; we can deal with your child’s urgent medical matters.
By 7 DAY PEDIATRICS
November 13, 2017
Category: Safety
Tags: Child Safety   Safety  

You would never let your children ride in a car without a seat belt. For the same common sense safety reasons, you shouldn't let your children bike safetyride their bikes without helmets either. While riding a bike is a fun and timeless childhood activity, it can also be a very dangerous one if you don't insist your children follow proper precautions.

But Bicycle Accidents Almost Never Happen!

While you may not think bicycle accidents are that common, the truth is that hundreds of thousands of children are involved in bicycle accidents every year. While not all of these are fatal, too many of them are. When something as simple as an adequate helmet can save your child’s life in the case of an accident, it’s hard to think of a single reason not to get one.

But My Child Doesn’t Like Helmets!

Do your children complain that their helmets are too hot or uncomfortable? These complaints are common, but they don't have to be persistent. First, choose the right helmets for your children ­ ones that will be comfortable while still providing enough protection. Then, simply insist that your children wear them. Once your children see that helmets are a requirement and they will not be riding their bikes without them, they'll be much less likely to put up a fuss.

Sure, bike helmets may not seem "cool," but at the end of the day, looking cool matters far less than staying safe. If your child is worried about how the helmet makes them look to their friends, one way to make it more fun for them is by letting them customize it. Buy colorful stickers and let your child decorate the helmet to their heart’s content!

It’s the Law

In fact, in some states, you may even have the law on your side as well. In California, for example, children are required to wear bicycle helmets by law. If they neglect to wear them while riding their bikes, their parents could be faced with a fine.

You already insist that your children wear their seat belts and eat their vegetables. It's time to start insisting that they wear their bicycle helmets as well. Even if your children complain, you'll know you've made the right choice.

By 7 Days Pediatrics
September 13, 2017
Category: Safety
Tags: Concussions  

Child's ConcussionA hit to the head during a soccer game or a hard fall from skateboarding may result in a serious head injury and even a concussion. The American Academy of Pediatrics describes a concussion as any injury to the brain that disrupts normal brain function on a temporary or permanent basis. These injuries are typically caused by a blow to the head, most often occurring while playing contact sports such as football, hockey, soccer, wrestling or skateboarding.

For some children, concussions only last for a short while. Other times, a person can have symptoms of a concussion that last for several days or weeks following the injury. Not all symptoms of concussions will be obvious, and in some cases take several hours to set in. Look for these signs of a concussion if your child suffers a head injury:

  • Headaches
  • Nausea or vomiting
  • Dizziness or loss of balance
  • Memory loss or confusion
  • Poor concentration
  • Vision problems
  • Fatigue
  • Irritability or changes in mood
  • Sensitivity to light or noise

Seek Medical Attention

If your child injures his head or you believe he may have a concussion, it is important that the child discontinues play immediately and visits a healthcare provider for an evaluation. All concussions are serious and should be monitored right away. A pediatrician can properly diagnose the concussion and its severity, and then make appropriate treatment recommendations.

Rest from all activities is the best treatment for concussions. Your pediatrician can make appropriate recommendations for when the child should return to future play. Recovery time depends on the child and the severity of the concussion.

Preventing Head Injuries

Not all head injuries can be avoided, but you can do a few important things to prevent them.

  • Buckle Up. Make sure your child is properly buckled up in a seat belt, car seat or booster seat.  
  • Safety Gear. If your child plays sports, make sure he wears appropriate headgear and other safety equipment.
  • Awareness. Children should be taught how to play safe and understand the importance of reporting any type of head injury to their parent or coach.

All head injuries should be taken seriously.  Early detection and treatment is the best way to prevent serious complications. It’s never a bad idea to contact your pediatrician when you have questions or concerns about your child’s head injury.