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Posts for category: Safety

By 7 DAYS PEDIATRICS
February 15, 2021
Category: Safety
Tags: Pediatrician   Stitches  
When Does My Child Need StitchesWe all know how accident-prone kids can be. They get bruises, bumps, cuts, and scrapes from time and time. Most of the time, these boo-boos are nothing to worry about, but sometimes a cut or laceration may require turning to your pediatrician for stitches. Does your child need stitches? We know it isn’t always easy to tell. Here are some telltale signs that your child might need stitches,
  • Apply pressure to the cut for five minutes. If it’s still bleeding after five minutes, it probably needs stitches
  • The cut is more than ½-inch deep or longer
  • The cut is around their eye
  • The cut is on their face or neck and is longer than ¼ inch
  • The cut is gaping open
  • There is an object sticking out of it, including debris or glass
  • The cut is spurting blood
Any cut that spurts blood could be a sign of a nicked artery. Immediately apply pressure to the area and head to your local ER for immediate medical attention.

When should I call the pediatrician?

If in doubt about whether or not your child may need stitches, call your pediatrician. With the introduction of telehealth visits, many pediatricians can now look at images of the injury or wound through a simple online appointment and determine whether the child or teen needs to come in for stitches. While the warning signs above are telltale indicators that your child may need stitches, even if the cut doesn’t need stitches, you should still see the doctor if:
  • The cut was made by a rusty or metal object
  • There is redness, swelling, pus, or other signs of infection
  • The child has been bitten by an animal
  • The cut hasn’t healed within 10 days
  • There is still severe pain after a few hours
Cuts and wounds made by metal, rusty, or dirty objects may require your child to get a tetanus shot. This is why you should see your pediatrician right away, as it’s important for them to get this shot within 2-3 days after the injury.

If you still aren’t sure whether or not your child should get stitches, it doesn’t hurt to give your pediatrician a call. Let us know the symptoms your child is experiencing, and we can determine if their injury requires a closer look from our team. Call us today; we can deal with your child’s urgent medical matters.
By 7 DAY PEDIATRICS
November 13, 2017
Category: Safety
Tags: Child Safety   Safety  

You would never let your children ride in a car without a seat belt. For the same common sense safety reasons, you shouldn't let your children bike safetyride their bikes without helmets either. While riding a bike is a fun and timeless childhood activity, it can also be a very dangerous one if you don't insist your children follow proper precautions.

But Bicycle Accidents Almost Never Happen!

While you may not think bicycle accidents are that common, the truth is that hundreds of thousands of children are involved in bicycle accidents every year. While not all of these are fatal, too many of them are. When something as simple as an adequate helmet can save your child’s life in the case of an accident, it’s hard to think of a single reason not to get one.

But My Child Doesn’t Like Helmets!

Do your children complain that their helmets are too hot or uncomfortable? These complaints are common, but they don't have to be persistent. First, choose the right helmets for your children ­ ones that will be comfortable while still providing enough protection. Then, simply insist that your children wear them. Once your children see that helmets are a requirement and they will not be riding their bikes without them, they'll be much less likely to put up a fuss.

Sure, bike helmets may not seem "cool," but at the end of the day, looking cool matters far less than staying safe. If your child is worried about how the helmet makes them look to their friends, one way to make it more fun for them is by letting them customize it. Buy colorful stickers and let your child decorate the helmet to their heart’s content!

It’s the Law

In fact, in some states, you may even have the law on your side as well. In California, for example, children are required to wear bicycle helmets by law. If they neglect to wear them while riding their bikes, their parents could be faced with a fine.

You already insist that your children wear their seat belts and eat their vegetables. It's time to start insisting that they wear their bicycle helmets as well. Even if your children complain, you'll know you've made the right choice.

By 7 Days Pediatrics
September 13, 2017
Category: Safety
Tags: Concussions  

Child's ConcussionA hit to the head during a soccer game or a hard fall from skateboarding may result in a serious head injury and even a concussion. The American Academy of Pediatrics describes a concussion as any injury to the brain that disrupts normal brain function on a temporary or permanent basis. These injuries are typically caused by a blow to the head, most often occurring while playing contact sports such as football, hockey, soccer, wrestling or skateboarding.

For some children, concussions only last for a short while. Other times, a person can have symptoms of a concussion that last for several days or weeks following the injury. Not all symptoms of concussions will be obvious, and in some cases take several hours to set in. Look for these signs of a concussion if your child suffers a head injury:

  • Headaches
  • Nausea or vomiting
  • Dizziness or loss of balance
  • Memory loss or confusion
  • Poor concentration
  • Vision problems
  • Fatigue
  • Irritability or changes in mood
  • Sensitivity to light or noise

Seek Medical Attention

If your child injures his head or you believe he may have a concussion, it is important that the child discontinues play immediately and visits a healthcare provider for an evaluation. All concussions are serious and should be monitored right away. A pediatrician can properly diagnose the concussion and its severity, and then make appropriate treatment recommendations.

Rest from all activities is the best treatment for concussions. Your pediatrician can make appropriate recommendations for when the child should return to future play. Recovery time depends on the child and the severity of the concussion.

Preventing Head Injuries

Not all head injuries can be avoided, but you can do a few important things to prevent them.

  • Buckle Up. Make sure your child is properly buckled up in a seat belt, car seat or booster seat.  
  • Safety Gear. If your child plays sports, make sure he wears appropriate headgear and other safety equipment.
  • Awareness. Children should be taught how to play safe and understand the importance of reporting any type of head injury to their parent or coach.

All head injuries should be taken seriously.  Early detection and treatment is the best way to prevent serious complications. It’s never a bad idea to contact your pediatrician when you have questions or concerns about your child’s head injury.

By 7 Days Pediatrics
September 13, 2017
Category: Safety
Tags: Playground Safety  

Playground SafetyWhether it’s at the park, school or in your own backyard, kids of all ages enjoy climbing on the monkey bars, going down the slide and swinging.  Playgrounds are a great place for kids to exercise, take in fresh air and socialize with friends.   Unfortunately, it’s also a place many kids get injured every year as a result of faulty equipment and improper use.  In fact, each year more than 200,000 kids under the age of 15 are treated in hospital emergency rooms for playground-related injuries.

While there are some inevitable dangers, the good news is that many of these injuries can easily be prevented with proper supervision. Do you know what to look for to make sure your playground is safe?

Play it Safe: What to Look for at Your Playground

Risks linked with playground safety may not be as apparent as those associated with swimming or biking; you just have to know what to look for. You can make the playground safe and fun for your kids by checking equipment and surfacing for potential hazards and following some simple safety guidelines. These include:

  • Always supervise your child to ensure playground equipment is used properly.  
  • Regularly check playground equipment for loose, sharp or broken parts. 
  • Know which surfacing is most appropriate. Sand, wood chips and rubberized matting are the safest surfaces for playgrounds, while concrete or asphalt could lead to a serious injury if a child falls.
  • Make sure playground equipment is age and size appropriate for your child.
  • Minimize injuries by teaching your kids basic playground rules.
  • Play areas for younger children should be separated from those for older kids.
  • Don’t let children wear drawstrings, purses, necklaces or other items that could get caught on equipment.
  • Report dangerous playgrounds to responsible parties.
  • Ask your pediatrician about other tips for playground safety.

Don’t let careless behavior or a faulty apparatus ruin playground fun.  To minimize injuries, always be on the lookout for faulty equipment, improper surfaces, and careless behavior.  Play is an essential part of a child’s physical, social, intellectual, and emotional development. Following these playground safety tips will help your kids play as safely as possible.

By 7 Days Pediatrics
September 13, 2017
Category: Safety
Tags: Medication Safety  
When it comes to your children, we want to make sure they are always healthy and happy. Any type of medicine or vitamin can ultimately cause harm to you and your child if it is taken improperly. Yes, even over-the-counter medicine. With help from your pediatrician, you can review your family’s home and medication safety measures often. By visiting your pediatrician, you can also learn more about safe medication: 
  • Storage
  • Dosing 
  • What to do in an emergency

Food and Medication Interactions

Medical treatments can affect the way your child digests and absorbs food, just as what children eat can influence the effects the medications have on the body. Talking to your pediatrician will help with this confusion. 
 
For example, griseofulvin, which is an anti-fungal medication, needs to be taken with a fatty meal otherwise, it will not be absorbed properly. Additionally, iron supplements for anemia should be taken with a mild acid like orange juice because the use of milk will cause it to not be absorbed properly. 
 
The use of medication can affect your child’s nutrition in four different ways. They can:
  • Stimulate or suppress appetite
  • Alter the amount of nutrients and rate of absorption
  • Affect the way the body breaks down and uses nutrients
  • Slow down or speed up the rate food is digested

Visit Your Pediatrician

When taking any medication or vitamin, always ask your pediatrician first. Your pediatrician can explain whether a medication should be taken with meals or on an empty stomach. With thousands of possible drug-food interactions, it is vital that you speak with your pediatrician for further information and instructions for your child. 
 
Remember to check every prescription with your pharmacist and pediatrician, as well as read the package insert for the best care for your child.