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Posts for: April, 2018

By 7 DAY PEDIATRICS
April 17, 2018
Category: Pediatric Care
Tags: Asthma   Sports  

While asthma may make playing sports more difficult, it certainly doesn't have to rule out sports altogether. Simply follow these five guidelines and your children will have a great time playing, without you worrying about their safety.

1. Choose the Right Sport

Some sports pose more of a danger than others. Sports such as ice skating, ice hockey, soccer and running pose the most risk due to the cold weather and the periods of intense activity with little break. Sports such as swimming, bowling and golf generally pose less risk.

2. Inform Your Child's Coach

Once your child is signed up, but before he or she goes out to play, have a friendly discussion with the coach. Let the coach know what warning signs to watch out for, and that while your child can play, he or she does have a legitimate complaint if pushed too far.

3. Teach Your Child the Warning Signs to Watch Out For

While the coach should keep an eye on your child, your child needs to be able to spot the warning signs of an asthma attack first. Common symptoms your child should know to watch out for include coughing, tightness in the chest, shortness of breath, decreased performance, and difficulty breathing.

4. Make Sure Your Child Always Has an Inhaler on Hand

An inhaler is typically the best defense against a sudden asthma attack, and your child won't want to be caught without one.

5. Watch the Weather Forecast

If your child plays an outdoor sport, you may want to watch the weather forecast to be aware of certain trigger days. Both cold weather and allergies can be triggers, and you may need to keep your child home on the worst days.

With the proper precautions and knowledge, there is no reason your child can't be part of the team! Simply follow these five safety procedures so your child can have fun without worry.


By 7 DAY PEDIATRICS
April 03, 2018
Category: Pediatric Health
Tags: Children   Type 1 Diabetes  

Diabetes can be a frightening and overwhelming diagnosis for anyone, but the condition can be especially frightening for young children who may not fully understand the condition or its ramifications.

Since type 1 diabetes is a condition that isn't likely to go away anytime soon, you'll have to find ways to help yourself and your child deal with the new diagnosis. Here are the first four steps you should take.

1. Help Your Child Understand the Disease

Unless your child has a relative or friend who also suffers from type 1 diabetes, he or she probably doesn't really understand what it is. Do some research together and explain everything in kid­-friendly terms as much as possible. Find out what questions your child has, and answer them to the best of your ability.

2. Help Your Child Recognize the Warning Signs to Watch Out For

Diabetes can be dangerous, especially when it is not treated in a timely fashion. Teach your child the signs of high and low blood sugar that he or she needs to watch out for. Common symptoms include extreme thirst, tiredness, sudden vision changes, constant hunger and frequent urination.

3. Teach Your Child How to Perform Routine Care Procedures

With type 1 diabetes, proper care is crucial, even during those times when you cannot be around. Teach your child how to take or inject insulin, how to eat a healthy diet and how to get the right amount of exercise. This will help keep him or her safe when you're not around.

4. Address the Social Aspect as Well

Lastly, don't neglect to address the social aspect of diabetes as well. Children may feel left out, sad, different or in trouble because they have a condition the rest of their friends don't have. Address your child's fears and concerns in a friendly and truthful way. Your child will pick up on the clues you send more than you know.

Type 1 diabetes can be frightening and overwhelming at first, but you don't have to let it take over your lives. These four action steps will get you started on the path to success!