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Posts for: October, 2017

By 7 DAY PEDIATRICS
October 13, 2017
Category: Pediatric Care
Tags: immunizations   Vaccinations   Shots  

Are you one of the many parents worried about giving your child his or her vaccines? If so, you aren't alone. Every year, doctors see patients vaccinationswho express concern or flat-­out refuse to vaccinate their children. Thankfully, however, many of the concerns about vaccines are based on misinformation. Here are four very common vaccine myths, as well as the truth that refutes them!

1. Vaccines Cause Autism and Other Disorders

While autism has been on the rise lately, it isn't because of vaccinations. The study that expressed concern about the link between the two was based on poor quality research and was later retracted. Unfortunately, this was not until after vaccine critics heard the news and a false reputation for autism causation spread. The fact of the matter is that the link between autism and vaccines has been unequivocally refuted by good research, and no sound link between the two has ever been established.

2. The Diseases that Vaccines Prevent Aren't a Threat Anymore

While it's true that most of the diseases vaccines are intended to treat are no longer a major public health concern today, this is, in fact, thanks to continuous vaccinations! By no means does this mean that these diseases are gone for good. In fact, outbreaks still happen in areas when communities fail to vaccinate on schedule. Steady vaccination creates an effect called 'herd immunity,' where, because most individuals are vaccinated, those who cannot be (caused by a variety of factors, including ongoing cancer treatment or autoimmune disorders) are still protected from deadly diseases. Not only is vaccinating your child keeping them safe, it's the responsible choice to protect your friends and neighbors. Help those who cannot help themselves by getting your child vaccinated!

3. Having Too Many Vaccines at Once Will Harm My Child's Immune System

While the number of vaccines children receive can be overwhelming, that doesn't mean they are unsafe. Children are exposed to thousands of new germs throughout their childhoods, and their bodies are used to encountering them and dealing with them all at once. It's no different with vaccines.

4. It's Safer to Wait Until Children are Older to Vaccinate Them

If we knew exactly when children would be exposed to a terrible disease and which disease it would be in advance, it would be easy to vaccinate them right before they were exposed. The reality, however, is that we never know what children will be exposed to and when. The sooner they are vaccinated, the greater the chances that their bodies will be prepared whenever and if ever they are exposed.

Vaccines may seem frightening, but don't let the myths scare you away. When it comes to keeping your children healthy, vaccines are the way to go.


By 7 Day Pediatrics
October 04, 2017
Category: Vaccines

Learn more about important immunizations and when your child needs them.vaccines, immunizations

While no one likes getting needles they are an important part of keeping your child or teenager healthy. There are so many life-threatening and serious conditions that could affect your child’s health if they don’t get the proper vaccinations. Fortunately, seeing your 7 Day Pediatrics pediatrician regularly will ensure that your child is up to date on all of their vaccinations. Here is the vaccination schedule you should follow.

Birth

After your baby is born they will usually come in for their first visit within the first 24 hours after being discharged from the hospital. During this time they should receive the first dose of the Hepatitis B vaccine.

1-2 months old

At this point your child should receive the second round of their Hepatitis B vaccine.

2 and 4 months old

Two and four months are important ages for your little one because they will require several difference vaccines including:

  • Diphtheria, tetanus and pertussis (DTap)
  • H. influenza type b (Hib)
  • Polio (IPV)
  • Pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV)
  • Rotavirus (RV)

6 months old

This is about the time that your child will get the third dose of DTap, Hib, PCV and RV. You should also consider getting your child vaccinated every year for the flu.

6-18 months

During this time your child will get the last dose of the Hepatitis b vaccine, as well as the second half of the polio vaccine.

12-15 months old

Now is the time to get your child vaccinated for the chickenpox. They will also get the final round of the Hib vaccine, as well as measles, mumps and rubella (MMR) and the third round of the PCV vaccine.

12-23 months

During this period your little one will receive the Hepatitis A vaccine. This vaccine comes in two parts, which will be given about 6 months apart or more from each other.

15-18 months

The only vaccine your child will need during this time is DTap.

4-6 years

This is another important stretch for your child as they will need to get the DTap, MMR, IPV and varicella vaccines during this period of time.

11-12 years

Beside the DTaP and meningococcal vaccinations, it’s also a good idea to talk to your child’s doctor about whether they should be vaccinated for HPV. This vaccine can protect teenage boys and girls from genital warts and certain forms of cancer.

16-18 years

Your teen will need to get the meningococcal B vaccine (which comes in either two or three doses). This immunization isn’t always necessary so your pediatrician will tell you whether your child should get it.

Do you have questions about your child’s vaccinations? Do you need to schedule your child or teen’s next doctor’s appointment? Turn to a 7 Day Pediatrics pediatrician you can trust to get the best care possible time and time again. Vaccines are a surefire way to keep your children healthy as they continue to grow.


By 7 DAYS PEDIATRICS
October 02, 2017
Category: Pediatric Health
Tags: Asthma  
Does your child ever wheeze, cough or feel tightness in the chest? If so, your child may be suffering from asthma. For most kids breathing is simple. They breathe in through their nose and out through
their mouths with the air going into the windpipe, which then travels through the airways and into the lungs. However, children who suffer from asthma do not have as much of an easy time breathing, as their airways are very sensitive, making breathing a lot more difficult.  
 
And when your child has an asthma flare-up, or an asthma attack, it can be alarming and nerve-wracking. When an asthma attack occurs, a person’s airways get swollen and narrower, making it harder for air to get in and out of the longs. By understanding asthma, and asthma attacks, you can help your child breathe easier and better.  

What Causes My Child’s Asthma Flare-Up?

Various triggers can cause your child’s asthma flare-up. Some kids are sensitive to allergens, which are substances that cause allergic reactions in the airways. Some common allergens for kids with asthma include:
  • Dust mites
  • Mold
  • Pollen
There are a lot of children who suffer from asthma flare-ups when they are near furry animals, such as dogs and cats because they have what is called animal dander in their fur. This dander is a type of dandruff that is a trigger that can cause a powerful reaction in the airways. 
 
Some substances can trigger flare-ups because they irritate the airways. These substances include:
  • Perfume
  • Chalk dust
  • Cigarette smoke

Treating Asthma 

If your child has asthma, they should try to avoid things that can cause their airways to tighten. Some triggers, such as cats, colds and chalk dust, can’t always be avoided. In instances where the trigger cannot be avoided medication can help your child manage their asthma. Not everyone’s asthma is the same, but there are different types of medicine available to help treat and manage asthma.  
 
When treating asthma it is not like curing a sore throat or an earache, when everybody gets the same medicine. Instead, your child’s pediatrician will think about the causes of your child’s asthma flare-ups, how fast they happen and how serious they are. With that, your pediatrician will decide on the best kind of treatment for your child.  
 
Some children will take asthma medication only once in a while, when they have a flare-up. This treatment is referred to rescue medicine because it works fast to open the airways, so that the person can breathe properly. Other kids may need to take controller medicine every day, which works to keep flare-ups from happening.  
 
If your child is suffering from asthma, visit your pediatrician for further diagnosis and treatment. Depending on the asthma triggers, your pediatrician may prescribe an inhaler or other forms of treatment to help your child breathe better. 

By 7 DAYS PEDIATRICS
October 02, 2017
Category: Pediatric Care
Tags: Sports Injuries  

No parent wants a child hurt during gym class or a ball game. However, the fact is that 2.6 million children go to hospital emergency roomssports injuries every year in the United States because of sports injuries, says the National Institute of Arthritis & Musculoskeletal & Skin Diseases. What can you do to prevent these problems, and how can your pediatrician at 7 Days Pediatrics in Edison and South Plainfield, NJ and serving Fords and Perth Amboy, and Woodbridge help? Read how here.

What are the most common injuries?

Children engage in all kinds of physical activities these days--both in and out of school. Baseball, soccer, martial arts, football, and cheer leading are just a few. They result in a wide range of acute and many times chronic injuries to the head, chest and upper and lower extremities, the most common of which is the ankle sprain.

Other injuries your team pediatricians in Edison and South Plainfield, NJ and serving Fords and Perth Amboy, and Woodbridge see are:

  • Lacerations and bruises
  • Strains
  • Buckle fractures, affecting the long bones of the arms and legs
  • Fractures of the fingers and toes
  • Heat exhaustion
  • Concussions
  • Sun burns
  • Back injuries
  • Growth plate injuries of the long bones
  • Tooth avulsion and tooth fracture

Your children's doctor plays an important role in assessing, stabilizing and treating these injuries. The pediatrician teaches youngsters and parents the basics of staying safe while playing contact and non-contact sports alike.

First aid for sudden injuries

The team at 7 Day Pediatrics wants youngsters, parents, coaches and teachers to know the basics of first aid. Say, for example, a child goes down with a twisted ankle during a basketball game. Would you know what to do? Simply employ RICE:

  1. Rest--that is, stay off the ankle as much as possible
  2. Ice--20 minutes on and 20 minutes off
  3. Compression--with an elastic bandage
  4. Elevation--of the leg above the heart

RICE controls swelling and provides comfort for a sprained ankle. Then, contact the doctor's office.

More services

Additionally, your pediatrician provides sports physicals for school and town teams and tells children and teens the importance of staying active, eating a healthy diet and staying hydrated.

Prevention is key to an active lifestyle at any age. Regarding sports, your children's doctor stresses:

  • Good physical conditioning before starting a sport
  • Adequate hydration
  • Sunscreen application for summer sports
  • Wearing protective gear such as batting helmets, mouthguards and properly fitting shoes
  • Knowing how to use sporting equipment
  • Warming up and stretching

When something happens...

If an injury is life-threatening, get to the nearest hospital ER immediately. For less severe problems, please contact 7 Days Pediatrics in Edison and South Plainfield, NJ for compassionate and accurate advice and a same-day appointment if needed. We are open seven days a week and are proud to serve the families in and around Fords, Perth Amboy and Woodbridge. For all our locations, call (732) 548-3210 and our fax number is (732) 906-3966.