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Posts for category: Pediatric Health

By 7 DAY PEDIATRICS
May 03, 2018
Category: Pediatric Health
Tags: Eye Problems  

When your little one is first born they will go through a series of tests and screenings to make sure they are healthy. This includes checking theirEye Problems vital signs, hearing, and vision. Your child’s first battery of health screenings will occur while you are still in the hospital. If everything checks out just fine then you’ll be good to go until you need to visit the pediatrician in the coming week. Of course, if we discover that there is an issue with their vision you may need to visit your child’s pediatrician sooner.

Of course, not all pediatric eye problems occur at birth. They can also happen as your child continues to develop over the years. This is why it’s so important that you are visiting your pediatric doctor regularly to ensure that if there is a problem with your child’s vision that they get the proper care they need to prevent more serious issues from happening.

Here are just some of the most common eye problems that children face:

  • Nystagmus: A condition that causes involuntary and repetitive eye movements, which results in a reduction in vision.
  • Strabismus: Sometimes referred to as crossed eyes, this is when the eyes are not aligned with one another.
  • Amblyopia: Colloquially referred to as a “lazy eye”, this condition occurs when vision is one eye doesn’t develop properly, resulting in reduced vision.
  • Congenital cataract: While most people associate cataracts with older individuals, it is possible for a child to be born with this condition that causes clouding of the ocular lens.

Some eye problems can be caught at birth; however, it’s important to understand that babies aren’t born with all of their visual capabilities. This is something that is learned over time as their eyes continue to develop and send signals to their brain. A baby’s vision isn’t as clear as ours; however, in the first few months, you’ll begin to see them focus on objects close up, develop eye-hand coordination as they grab for things they want or follow moving objects.

Of course, you will have a pediatrician schedule to follow, which ensures that your little one is getting the proper care, checkups, vaccinations, and screenings they need to check off certain developmental milestones. If your pediatrician detects vision problems they will most likely refer you to a pediatric eye doctor who can provide you with the best treatment options.

If at any time you become worried about your child’s vision, then it’s important that you make an appointment with your pediatrician to have their vision tested. Your pediatrician is here to make sure that your growing child gets the care they need throughout the course of their developing life so they can become a healthy, happy adult.

By 7 DAY PEDIATRICS
April 03, 2018
Category: Pediatric Health
Tags: Children   Type 1 Diabetes  

Diabetes can be a frightening and overwhelming diagnosis for anyone, but the condition can be especially frightening for young children who may not fully understand the condition or its ramifications.

Since type 1 diabetes is a condition that isn't likely to go away anytime soon, you'll have to find ways to help yourself and your child deal with the new diagnosis. Here are the first four steps you should take.

1. Help Your Child Understand the Disease

Unless your child has a relative or friend who also suffers from type 1 diabetes, he or she probably doesn't really understand what it is. Do some research together and explain everything in kid­-friendly terms as much as possible. Find out what questions your child has, and answer them to the best of your ability.

2. Help Your Child Recognize the Warning Signs to Watch Out For

Diabetes can be dangerous, especially when it is not treated in a timely fashion. Teach your child the signs of high and low blood sugar that he or she needs to watch out for. Common symptoms include extreme thirst, tiredness, sudden vision changes, constant hunger and frequent urination.

3. Teach Your Child How to Perform Routine Care Procedures

With type 1 diabetes, proper care is crucial, even during those times when you cannot be around. Teach your child how to take or inject insulin, how to eat a healthy diet and how to get the right amount of exercise. This will help keep him or her safe when you're not around.

4. Address the Social Aspect as Well

Lastly, don't neglect to address the social aspect of diabetes as well. Children may feel left out, sad, different or in trouble because they have a condition the rest of their friends don't have. Address your child's fears and concerns in a friendly and truthful way. Your child will pick up on the clues you send more than you know.

Type 1 diabetes can be frightening and overwhelming at first, but you don't have to let it take over your lives. These four action steps will get you started on the path to success!

By 7 DAY PEDIATRICS
January 02, 2018
Category: Pediatric Health
Tags: Concussions  

A concussion is a temporary injury to the brain often caused by a fall or a forceful blow. If your child has a concussion, it is important to seek medical help right away. While most people recover from concussions on their own within a day to a week's time, concussions can lead to other major health problems that need to be addressed, so seeking medical assistance is important.

How Do Children Get Concussions?

One common way that children get concussions is while playing contact sports. During sports, children often fall down, get knocked down, get hit or run into others - all of which can cause a concussion. This certainly is not the only way, however. Children can also get concussions as the result of falling down on the playground, fighting, or getting into a car or bicycle accident. Anything that causes a forceful blow to the head can cause a concussion.

Symptoms of a Concussion

The symptoms of a concussion can vary widely among children. While a concussion can be accompanied by an unconscious period, it doesn't have to be. Concussions that occur without an unconscious period can be just as serious.

Common physical symptoms of a concussion include: headache, dizziness, lack of coordination, blurred vision and nausea. Common mental symptoms of a concussion include: feeling confused, forgetful or unable to focus. Concussions can also cause children to be more or less sleepy or to feel anxious, sad or irritable. If your child seems "out of it" or "not himself or herself," a concussion may be to blame.

At-Home Treatment for a Concussion

If your child has unequal pupils, weakness on one side of the body or neck pain, or if your child is vomiting repeatedly, very drowsy or unconscious, call 911 immediately.

If your child seems okay, however, the doctor will probably advise you to simply monitor him or her at home. You will want to have your child rest. Your child also may want an ice pack to help with any swelling as well as an over-­the-­counter pain medicine to help with any pain.

Observe your child closely for 24 hours. If your child's symptoms disappear on their own, this is a good sign.

If they worsen, however, call the doctor right away. The doctor will be able to do the necessary tests and scans to look for more serious brain damage.

By 7 DAY PEDIATRICS
December 15, 2017
Category: Pediatric Health
Tags: Puberty   Voice Change   Cracking  

It happens when you least expect it. One night your little boy goes to bed with a sweet, high- pitched voice and the next morning he wakes up with a deep voice. A voice change can be really exciting, but it can also be a little embarrassing and nerve-­racking too. Here's what you need to know.

Why Do Boys' Voices Change?

As boys grow and develop, their throats grow as well. Before puberty, a boy's vocal cords are small and thin; after puberty, his vocal cords become thicker and longer. This change in shape and shape produces a change in sound as well. Combine this change with the changes that happen in the facial bones, nasal cavities and throat, and a deeper sound is created. Both boys and girls experience this same change, but the effect is much more noticeable in boys than in girls.

When Do Boys' Voices Change?

Boys' voices change sometime during puberty, or between 11 and 15 years old. The most common ages for the voice to change are 12 and 13. The change can happen gradually or quickly, but it usually doesn't happen all at once.

How to Help Your Son Deal with a Changing Voice

A cracking, changing voice can be embarrassing for a young man who is suddenly no longer able to control the sound of his own voice. Help him ease this transition by assuring him that the cracking and breaking noises are completely normal, that all boys go through it, and that it doesn't last long. Advise him to try clearing his throat and starting again if his voice starts to crack, and to just go on like nothing has happened. Other people won't make a big deal out of it if he doesn't.

A voice change is an exciting time in a boy's life. Help him to see past the embarrassment and embrace the fact that he is growing up to be a man!

By 7 DAYS PEDIATRICS
October 02, 2017
Category: Pediatric Health
Tags: Asthma  
Does your child ever wheeze, cough or feel tightness in the chest? If so, your child may be suffering from asthma. For most kids breathing is simple. They breathe in through their nose and out through
their mouths with the air going into the windpipe, which then travels through the airways and into the lungs. However, children who suffer from asthma do not have as much of an easy time breathing, as their airways are very sensitive, making breathing a lot more difficult.  
 
And when your child has an asthma flare-up, or an asthma attack, it can be alarming and nerve-wracking. When an asthma attack occurs, a person’s airways get swollen and narrower, making it harder for air to get in and out of the longs. By understanding asthma, and asthma attacks, you can help your child breathe easier and better.  

What Causes My Child’s Asthma Flare-Up?

Various triggers can cause your child’s asthma flare-up. Some kids are sensitive to allergens, which are substances that cause allergic reactions in the airways. Some common allergens for kids with asthma include:
  • Dust mites
  • Mold
  • Pollen
There are a lot of children who suffer from asthma flare-ups when they are near furry animals, such as dogs and cats because they have what is called animal dander in their fur. This dander is a type of dandruff that is a trigger that can cause a powerful reaction in the airways. 
 
Some substances can trigger flare-ups because they irritate the airways. These substances include:
  • Perfume
  • Chalk dust
  • Cigarette smoke

Treating Asthma 

If your child has asthma, they should try to avoid things that can cause their airways to tighten. Some triggers, such as cats, colds and chalk dust, can’t always be avoided. In instances where the trigger cannot be avoided medication can help your child manage their asthma. Not everyone’s asthma is the same, but there are different types of medicine available to help treat and manage asthma.  
 
When treating asthma it is not like curing a sore throat or an earache, when everybody gets the same medicine. Instead, your child’s pediatrician will think about the causes of your child’s asthma flare-ups, how fast they happen and how serious they are. With that, your pediatrician will decide on the best kind of treatment for your child.  
 
Some children will take asthma medication only once in a while, when they have a flare-up. This treatment is referred to rescue medicine because it works fast to open the airways, so that the person can breathe properly. Other kids may need to take controller medicine every day, which works to keep flare-ups from happening.  
 
If your child is suffering from asthma, visit your pediatrician for further diagnosis and treatment. Depending on the asthma triggers, your pediatrician may prescribe an inhaler or other forms of treatment to help your child breathe better.