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Posts for category: Child's Health

By 7 DAYS PEDIATRICS
October 14, 2020
Category: Child's Health
Tags: Childhood Asthma   Asthma  
Helping Your Child Live Well With AsthmaAsthma is one of the most common chronic disorders that pediatricians diagnose in children and teens. While there is no cure for asthma there are effective ways to manage your child’s symptoms to prevent flare-ups and attacks while also ensuring that they are able to live a full, healthy life. It’s important to recognize the warning signs of childhood asthma. Symptoms include,
  • Wheezing
  • Shortness of breath
  • Rapid, shallow breathing
  • Fatigue
  • Easily winded, especially after exercise
  • A persistent cough that usually gets worse at night or after activity
  • Chest tightness or congestion
If your child is experiencing asthma symptoms, it’s important that you bring them in for a pediatric evaluation as soon as possible as untreated asthma can be dangerous. If your child has been diagnosed with asthma, here are some of the best ways to help them manage their symptoms,

Visit the pediatrician often

Even if your child’s symptoms seem to be well managed through medication and lifestyle it’s still important that you bring them into the pediatrician’s office for regular care. Your pediatrician will be able to evaluate whether their current medications are fully controlling your child’s symptoms. If symptoms aren’t improving, you should also see your pediatrician right away.

Create an asthma action plan

It’s important that you and your child’s doctor sit down and create a detailed asthma action plan that will outline how you are managing your child’s symptoms and what to do in case of an asthma attack. Within the action plan, you will include the ways in which you are currently controlling your child’s asthma as well as symptoms to look for regarding a flare-up or attack, and when to see a doctor for care.

Alter your child’s lifestyle

It’s important to talk with your pediatrician about your child’s asthma triggers. By determining what triggers their allergies (e.g. pet dander; pollen) you can also figure out ways to avoid these allergies. Avoid household products or certain chemicals that may cause asthma to flare up. Bathing pets weekly, keeping the house clean and avoiding letting your child play outdoors on high pollen days are all ways to reduce allergen exposure in your asthmatic child.

If your child is displaying symptoms of asthma, or if their symptoms aren’t being properly controlled, call our pediatric practice today to schedule an immediate evaluation. We can provide you with a customized treatment that will make your whole family breathe a little easier.
By 7 DAYS PEDIATRICS
May 18, 2020
Category: Child's Health
Tags: Tonsillitis  
TonsillitisEveryone is born with two tonsils. These are lymph nodes located right in the back of the throat. They help out the immune system by housing important white blood cells. Even so, the tonsils themselves can become infected, which is known as tonsillitis. The tonsils swell up, causing pain and discomfort. Children between the ages of five and eleven experience it the most. You need to bring your child in to see a pediatrician right away. Tonsillitis is commonly caused by streptococcus pyogenes also known as strep throat. 
 
The Basics of Tonsillitis
 
Your tonsils work by trapping dangerous viruses and bacteria within. As mentioned before, this can lead them to become infected. Infections are easily transferred between children, with tonsillitis being caused by strep, adenovirus, the flu, and Epstein-Barr virus (mono).
 
Your pediatrician is highly qualified in treating tonsillitis. That is because almost all cases are found in children. During puberty, the tonsils shrink in size. This makes it much harder for them to become infected. You need to seek medical intervention right away. Infections can become life-threatening if not treated, leading to diseases like rheumatic fever. An even more serious complication is a peritonsillar abscess. The infection spreads beyond the tonsils and swells up the neck and chest tissues. This can block and stop your child’s airways. 
 
Signs of Tonsillitis in Children
 
In children under the age of two that have problems communicating what is wrong, symptoms manifest in the form of excessive drooling, refusing food or bottles, and fussiness. Expect these symptoms in older children: 
  • Sore throat
  • Noticeably bigger tonsils
  • Fever
  • Pain or problems with swallowing
  • Yellow or white patches coating the throat and tonsils
  • Swollen lymph nodes in the neck
  • Foul breath
  • Stiff neck
  • Headaches
  • A scratchy or rough voice
  • Stomach pain
Diagnosing Tonsillitis
 
Your pediatrician won’t have any trouble diagnosing your child with tonsillitis. They will first start by asking for a brief history of when your child started feeling sick. The next step is performing a physical exam. The pediatrician will look in the throat, nose, and ears. If strep is suspected, a nurse takes a swab of the throat. A blood test will also be drawn to identify what bacteria or virus is responsible.
 
If strep or another bacteria is responsible for your child’s tonsillitis, antibiotics are prescribed. It’s important that your child finishes the whole dose. This guarantees that the entire infection is gone.
By 7 Days Pediatrics
September 24, 2019
Category: Child's Health
Tags: Sports Physical  

When your child gets a school or sports physical, it’s an important way to prevent illness and injury. You want your child to stay healthy, so they don’t have to miss out on important school events and learning opportunities. The pediatricians at 7 Days Pediatrics offer a wide range of pediatric services, including school and sports physicals. They have several convenient office locations in Edison, and South Plainfield, New Jersey to help your child stay healthy.

When your child has a school physical, the doctor will record general information including your child’s height, weight, blood pressure, pulse, and temperature. This information will serve as a baseline to compare with future visits. Current medical issues, recent illnesses or injuries, medications, allergies, and any hospitalizations will also be recorded. The doctor may also ask for your family medical history. In addition to examining your child, the school physical also includes checking your child’s breathing, eyes, nose, throat, and ears, along with checking eyesight and hearing.

If your child wants to play a sport, they will need a sports physical. During the sports physical, your child’s reflexes, strength, and flexibility will be tested. In addition, the doctor will want to know if your child has experienced any harmful symptoms like chest pain, shortness of breath, or dizziness during physical activity. These could be early signs of potential problems later on.

The school physical and sports physical are both excellent opportunities for your child’s doctor to make sure your child is current on immunizations. Immunizations are required for your child to attend school, and they are also the first line of defense against serious illnesses like the flu, meningitis, the measles, and others. Immunizations also help keep you, your family, teachers, and students protected against disease.

Keep your child protected against illness and injury by scheduling a school or sports physical soon. To find out more about the importance of school and sports physicals, call the pediatricians at 7 Days Pediatrics, with offices in Edison, and South Plainfield, New Jersey. Call today.

By 7 DAYS PEDIATRICS
May 01, 2019
Category: Child's Health
Tags: Autism  

What is Autism?

Autism spectrum disorder (ASD), or autism, is a developmental disability that can cause significant communication, communication, and behavioral challenges. The thinking, learning, and problem-solving abilities of individuals with autism can range from gifted to severely challenged. Some individuals with autism need only a bit of help in their daily lives; others need more. While there's no cure for autism, early treatment can make a big difference in the lives of many children.

Overview

ASD is the fastest growing serious, developmental disability, affecting an estimated one out of 59 kids in America. Autism begins in early childhood and eventually causes problems functioning in society — at work, in school, and socially, for example. Often kids show symptoms of autism within the first year. Autism impacts how people perceive and socialize with others, causing problems in social interaction and communication.

Symptoms

Autism can look different in different people. Kids with autism have a hard time interacting with others. Social skills difficulties are some of the most common signs. A child with ASD might want to have close relationships but not know how. Most have some problems with communication. Kids with ASD also act in ways that seem unusual. Examples of this can include repetitive behaviors like jumping, hand-flapping, constant moving, fixations on certain objects, fussy eating habits, impulsiveness, and aggressive behavior.

Causes

The exact cause of ASD is not known, but it's believed that genetic and environmental factors are involved. Research shows that ASD tends to run in families. Changes in certain genes increase the risk that a child with develop autism. Research also shows that certain environmental influences may increase autism risk in people who are genetically predisposed to the disorder. Researchers are exploring whether certain factors such as medications, viral infections, or complications during pregnancy play a role in triggering ASD.

Treatment

Treatment options may include nutritional therapy, physical therapy, behavior and communication therapies, educational therapies, family therapies, and medications. No medication can improve the core signs of ASD, but specific medications can help control symptoms. For example, antipsychotic drugs are sometimes used to treat severe behavioral problems; certain medications may be prescribed if your child is hyperactive; and antidepressants may be prescribed for anxiety.


Autism can impact your child's quality of life. If you think your child may have autism, find a pediatrician near you and schedule a consultation. Proper diagnosis and treatment of autism can help your child live a happier, more successful life. The earlier children with autism get help, the greater their chance of treatment success.

By 7 DAY PEDIATRICS
February 06, 2019
Category: Child's Health
Tags: Whooping Cough  

Named after the characteristic sound of its notorious coughing fits, whooping cough is an extraordinarily uncomfortable condition that typically manifests itself in babies and in children ages 11 to 18 whose vaccine-provided immunities have begun to fade. In addition to causing several debilitating symptoms, whooping cough also carries the possibility of infant mortality, particularly for patients under 12 months old. Further complicating the matter, initial symptoms often resemble a common cold, making quick detection a tricky task. To be more proactive in the treatment and prevention of this disease, read below to learn the basics on whooping cough and how to best go about alleviating it.

What is Whooping Cough?

Officially diagnosed by the name pertussis, whooping cough is a highly contagious bacterial infection that resides within the nose and throat. Whooping cough is spread through airborne bacteria produced by an infected person’s sneezes, coughs, or laughs. Once whooping cough has been contracted, the apparent symptoms begin in an identical fashion to the common cold. That includes:

  • Runny nose

  • Mild cough

  • Fever (below 102 F)

  • Congestion and sneezing

After a week to 10 days, these symptoms begin to grow worse. Mucus thickens and starts to coat the patient’s airways, leading to rampant and prolonged coughing. These fits can be so violent that that they may cause vomiting, lengthy periods of extreme fatigue, and result in blue or red face. This last sign is the direct outcome of the body’s struggle to fill the lungs with air, and once breathing is finally achieved, the loud “whooping” sound that defines the condition is produced.

What are the Dangers of the Disease?

If left untreated, whooping cough can produce a number of painful and dangerous complications, with the specific ailments depending on the age of the patient.

For teens and adults, untreated whooping cough can result in:

  • Abdominal hernias

  • Bruised or cracked ribs

  • Broken blood vessels in the skin and whites of the eyes

For infants, complications from whooping cough are a great deal more severe. They include:

  • Pneumonia

  • Slowed or stopped breathing

  • Feeding difficulties, which may lead to dehydration and severe weight loss

  • Seizures

  • Brain damage

What Can I Do About It?

The best approach to preventing the disease is through vaccination. This is especially important for babies, as whooping cough leaves them in significant danger, though it is essential to keep your children on regular vaccination schedules, regardless of their individual age.

While vaccines are extremely effective in reducing the likelihood of contracting whooping cough, the possibility of developing the condition is still present. Due to this perpetual risk, if you witness your child’s cold symptoms continuing to worsen, arrange an appointment with their local pediatrician to find out if the problem may be whooping cough. If diagnosed early enough, antibiotics can be used to cut down on the painful symptoms and prevent the infection from spreading to others.

Concerned? Give Us a Call

Whooping cough is a serious condition that can be extremely dangerous if left untreated. If you have any suspicions that your child may have developed this condition, give us a call today!